Shared Destabilizing Practices within Archi-Choreographic Collaborations

image credit: Marie Davidova

image credit: Marie Davidova

Shared Destabilizing Practices within Archi-Choreographic Collaborations

June 26th, 2015.  IFTR @ Prague Quadrennial 2015
Abstract:

Since the match-making of Lucinda Childs with Frank Gehry in 1983 to create Available Light over fifty architect – choreographer teams have collaborated on the making of performance works. My research on these works and the process of their making has revealed a spectrum of approaches to collaboration, of shared or parallel practices, and areas of research that enabled collaboration between these two spatial disciplines.

The shared terrain has included the leveraging of external artifacts—such as biographies, narratives, and other creative works—to inform the making of both dance and spatial design. In other cases collaborators created works around shared interests in formal, spatial, and temporal structures; generative methodologies; disciplinary critiques; affect; or relational conditions of audience with performance. Yet other collaborations followed the Cunningham | Cage model of collaging performance elements that were developed independently. Still others exposed and problematized the underpinning structure of performed work and its making—through entangled relations that displace and distribute authorship, that reconfigure how space and action are made, and by whom.

Choreographer Richard Siegal and architect Francois Roche’s Civic Mimic (2011) plus William Forsythe’s Hausfurung (2005) within Nikolaus Hirsch’s design for the Bockenheimer Depot shall serve as the focus for this presentation. These and other open-ended, slippery works take advantage of choreographic | spatial systems that challenge assumptions about the fixed nature of works, spatial/choreographic form and structure, and authorial and relational structures.

Through my presentation my intention is to introduce these works that mobilize destabilizing and distributing practices in their performance and spatial designs, and situate them within the larger genre of archi-choreographic collaborations.

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